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Featured Poet: Kavita Jindal

Eyewear is very pleased to welcome the poet Kavita Jindal (pictured) this last Friday of the British summer, as September looms.  Jindal was born and raised in India. She lived and worked in Hong Kong for several years before settling in London.

She is the author of the poetry collection Raincheck Renewed (2004) published in Hong Kong.  Her poems, short stories and reviews have been published in various newspapers, literary journals, and anthologies, including The Independent, The South China Morning Post, Dimsum, The Mechanics Institute Review, Asian Cha, In Our Own Words, Not A Muse, and Asia Literary Review.

Jindal contributes a regular literary blog to Birkbeck’s Writers Hub website. She is also the convener of the Poetry Society’s south-west London Stanza.  She enjoys collaborating with photographers, painters, musicians and other artists on diverse projects.

Chaining the Ecstatic


As the white light on this summer’s day
is pulled back into the molten sky
white flowers begin to gleam
fresh against green hedges
in the slowpouring darkness.

White flowers gleam
while the garden’s other beauties
the scalding pinks  
recede with the last of the light
dissolving into stems, pots, fences.

So heaven this is where I find you
laying your silk sheet on me
while I stand still in June
inhaling the white bouquet of life.

poem by Kavita Jindal 

Comments

Ravee Ssantanam said…
White is indeed transcendental and prevails.. heaven is indeed a place on earth..

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