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Brown and the Bigot: A Susan Boyle Moment In Reverse

Poor Gordon Brown - he has been caught on microphone, calling a 65-year-old woman he had met on a meet-and-greet, a "bigot".  The media has played it up, and Brown has apologised on BBC radio (filmed doing so, head in hands), and also has called her to apologise in person - and then emailed his party to apologise too.  The BBC is calling it the worst moment for the Labour party so far in the election - an election that already sees them likely to come third behind the Tories and Lib-Dems.  However, this may garner sympathy.  If the woman did want to restrict immigration to keep out Eastern Europeans, she is, by definition, a bit of a bigot.  Brown actually does seem to care, and actually does have integrity.  His fault seems to be that he called it like it is.  Perhaps he was too quick to say he was sorry.  Still, the BBC news is emphasising the Janus-faced nature of the comments - that Brown would speak to a Labour supporter one way in person, and then fulminate against them immediately after in private.  Bad luck seems to hang over Brown like a fug. Tonight, this seems to be playing on and on, and snowballing.  The most famous Duffy in the UK may now be Gillian, not Carol Ann, Duffy.  This is Brown's Susan Boyle moment, in reverse.

Comments

Max TH said…
I think it's more a case of his lack of empathy with a woman who, quite clearly, has been forced inside an older mode of viewing immigration thanks to Labour's shambolic immigration policy, I might add. The woman is a lifelong Labour supporter, which hints that she is anything but a bigot. It's a sorry day when the PM himself is forced to label people after spending just a short amount of time with them. It highlights his complete lack of understanding with the public conscience. That is what people have noticed.
James said…
I think it was not calling it like it is that did for him: charm and manners for the lady, vituperation in the car. If he'd been calling it like it is he would have engaged her in debate.
Poetry Pleases! said…
Dear Todd

Poor old Gordon! My sister said that watching him is a bit like watching a defenceless puppy get kicked. Hopefully he will harvest plenty of sympathy votes.

Best wishes from Simon

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