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EYEWEAR POP UP SHOP IN NOTTING HILL WITH CB EDITIONS AND OTHER COOL INDIE PRESSES!

Pop Up Shop – July 2013

portobello roadSummertime – and though for poets and independent publishers the living isn’t exactly easy, it’s time to come out onto the street and play.
Specifically: THE SHOP. For the first week of July, 1st to 7th, Eyewear Publishing is joining forces with CB Editions. We will be taking a pop-up shop in Portobello Road, London: number 201, a block along from the Electric Cinema. We’ll be selling books from our own presses and those of some others (ArcFive LeavesFlipped Eye among them, and not exclusively poetry), and there’ll be photographic prints by Ken Garland and other things. And balloons. The shop is essentially a shop, and is hardly the most comfortable of reading venues, but there’ll be events in the evenings and pop-up readings by various poets during the daytime.
Those reading will include Laura Del Rivo, whose 1961 novel The Furnished Room was filmed as West 11, who has a story in the new Salt anthology of The Best British Short Stories 2013 and who still runs a stall in the market; Cathi Unsworth, who has published several novels set around Portobello Road and is a contributor to Five Leaves’ recent London Fictions; Andrew Motion; assorted Eyewear and Flipped Eye poets; Christopher Reid; and, oh, others.
Come and join the fun!  We’re having a launch party on 1st July from 7pm.  Join us for a glass of wine, and to hear a few poems from Mark Ford.
More details of the schedule coming soon!
Monday  1st 
Eyewear party with Mark Ford 7pm
Tuesday 2nd   
Leah Fritz 2.30pm
Kimberly Campanello 3.30pm
Christopher Reid 4pm
Wednesday 3rd
Tim Dooley 1.30pm
Fiona Curran 3pm
Andrew Motion 3.30pm
Thursday 4th   
Anthony Howell 3.30pm
Harry Man 5pm
Laura Del Rivo and Cathi Unsworth 6.30pm
Friday 5th
Tamar Yoseloff 1pm
John Greening  1.30pm
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